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Mystical-type experiences occasioned by psilocybin mediate the attribution
Psychedelic Psycotherapy: The ethics of the Medicine for the soul
La psilocibina puede ocasionar experiencias de tipo místico con significad


Psicoterapia Psiquedélica: La ética para la medicina del alma A hallucinogen is defined as “any agent that causesalterations in perception, cognition, and mood as its primary psychobiological actions in the presence of an otherwise clear sensorium” (Abraham, Aldridge, & Gogia, 1996, p. 287). Another word for “hallucinogen” is psychedelic,...
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Psychedelic Psycotherapy: The ethics of the Medicine for the soul

Brian Anderson

Sábado 9 de diciembre de 2006 (18/04/13)
ver en bioethicsjournal.com

Psicoterapia Psiquedélica: La ética para la medicina del alma




A hallucinogen is defined as “any agent that causesalterations in perception, cognition, and mood as its primary psychobiological actions in the presence of an otherwise clear sensorium” (Abraham, Aldridge, & Gogia, 1996, p. 287). Another word for “hallucinogen” is psychedelic, which comes from the Greek “to wander in the mind.” This is perhaps more accurate, since hallucinogenic drugs don’t actually produce true hallucinations; they engender illusions that are not normallymistaken for reality, but understood as an effect of the drug (Peoples, 2005).

The majority of known psychedelic drugs are classified by the DEA (Drug Enforcement Agency) as Schedule I compounds, meaning that they are considered to be “substances that have no accepted medical use in the U.S. and have a high abuse potential” (Meyer & Quenzer, 2005, p. 194). This assertion that psychedelics have “no accepted medical use” is a matter of contention that has been gaining a larger audience for the past couple decades. Since the first large push for the use ofpsychedelics in research and medicine in the 1950s and 1960s, psychedelics have largely been shunned from the US medical community.

[Fragmento]

Psychedelics are powerful drugs that have great potential to help as well as harm. This paper discusses the use of psychedelics in transpersonal psychotherapy and the ethical issues that accompany their employment as medicines. After examining how these drugs are thought to work in psychotherapy and their ability to cause authentically spiritual experiences, we should be betterprepared to make informed decisions about the use of these drugs that not only affect one’s body, but one’s mind or even soul. US law says psychedelics have no medical application, but depending on the results of a handful of current studies, this may soon change. Compared to many other drugs, psychedelics are relatively benign physiologically. Thus, many arguments against their use are moral, not medical, objections. And as Francis Fukuyama points out: “We are... unwilling to take a clear stand on drugs solely on the basis that they are bad for the soul” (Fukuyama, 2002, p. 56). Whether a drug is good or bad for the soul and a person’s spirituality is a tough question to ask, but that does not make it impossible to answer. The soul aside, how drugs affect consciousnessis a tough question in and of itself. Like any other state of consciousness, the psychedelic mind-state is poorly understood, but its implications for human spirituality and psychiatric health nonetheless warrant a thorough investigation, which in view of their potential benefits could even be seen as unethical not to pursue

ver en bioethicsjournal.com


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